Tripoli Gallery

Clock 7, 2012
Inkjet print on silver gelatin paper
26 x 31 inches

Clock 6, 2012
Inkjet print on silver gelatin paper
38 x 48 inches

Clock 5, 2012
Inkjet print on silver gelatin paper
38 x 48 inches

Clock 4, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches

Clock 3, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches

Clock 2, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches

Clock 1, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches

Instillation photographs by Zev Starr-Tambor, 2012

Instillation photographs by Zev Starr-Tambor, 2012

Don't Waste My Time

September 29 ‐ October 29, 2012

Download Press Release

In an age where we constantly find ourselves rushing against time and living as if ruled by the clock, Tin Ojeda captures the arbitrary – and sometimes absurd – anxiety attached to time with his solo exhibition entitled Don’t Waste My Time. In this exhibition, Ojeda unpacks the social significance of the proverbial clock and the role it plays in our culture today.

First, Ojeda focuses on the clock as an object in a series using 8 x 10 large format film and a silver gelatin printing process. He will present six unique photographs of hanging clocks frozen in the ticking of time, some paradoxically capturing several seconds in one instant. These photographs, which he manipulates in the dark room, depict the cultural symbol that has become so mythologized. The artist questions whether or not these compositions will induce anxiety, as they fictitiously represent time.

In a series of 16mm film portraits, Ojeda has asked numerous subjects to sit for a portrait as the camera captures them over the course of several minutes. In this way, Ojeda's subjects are exposed in a manner that is far more revealing than what would be in a single snapshot, which gives the viewer a unique interaction with the subjects. Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests act in a similar vein, yet Ojeda works in an unparalleled contemporary sensibility, which speak to the sculptural aspects unique to his installation. Suspending the projections on floating screens, the installations give the illusion of a three-dimensional person in front of the viewer. In the portraits depicting older people, the manifestation of time is apparent in the subject’s physical features. On the other hand, the portraits of younger subjects will act as a point of retrospect in the future, reflecting on the ways that time has treated us visually. Ojeda’s portraits aim to immortalize a moment in a life; a vignette that will remain unchanged as time passes.

There is a common thread present in Ojeda’s work that points to the angst provoked by and attached to time. With a tinge of irreverent humor, his work elucidates the reality that time motivates many of our daily rituals. Ojeda reflects on the notion of “being in a rush” and that it may be nothing but a superficial and contemporary construction. Don’t Waste My Time offers a moment of reflection when one can contemplate our own relationship with time and question the moments when we are dictated by the ticking of the clock.

 


Clock 7, 2012
Inkjet print on silver gelatin paper
26 x 31 inches


Clock 6, 2012
Inkjet print on silver gelatin paper
38 x 48 inches


Clock 5, 2012
Inkjet print on silver gelatin paper
38 x 48 inches


Clock 4, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches


Clock 3, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches


Clock 2, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches


Clock 1, 2012
Silver gelatin print
8 x 10 inches


Instillation photographs by Zev Starr-Tambor, 2012


Instillation photographs by Zev Starr-Tambor, 2012